Episode 99

[INTERVIEW] Stop being boring on LinkedIn (and make more sales)

Do you think LinkedIn wouldn’t work for your kind of business?

Maybe you’re already active on the platform but struggling to generate engagement/sales?


In this podcast episode, you’ll hear from four business owners who have built an engagement following on the platform - with a variety of businesses (both product and service based).


Useful links

Fay Wallis on LinkedIn

Gus Bhandal on LinkedIn

Toks Adebanjo Coyle on LinkedIn

Dara Stringham on LinkedIn

Janet Murray’s FREE Ultimate Course Launch Checklist

Janet Murray’s Courageous Launch Content Toolkit

Janet Murray’s Courators Kit

Stop being boring on LinkedIn! (podcast)

Janet Murray’s Courageous Content Planner

Janet Murray’s website

Janet Murray on Instagram

Janet Murray on Facebook

Janet Murray on TikTok

Janet Murray on Twitter

Janet Murray on LinkedIn


Transcript

IMPORTANT: THIS TRANSCRIPT IS AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED. WE GIVE IT A QUICK CHECK THROUGH BUT WE DON’T CORRECT EVERYTHING AS IT’S INTENDED TO HELP YOU FIND PARTS YOU WANT TO LISTEN TO AGAIN - NOT AS AN EXACT TRANSCRIPT. SO THERE MIGHT BE A FEW QUIRKY WORDS/PHRASES HERE!

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You telling, tell your story. You just told the world about who you are. And don't worry about those people that say is, is on Facebook. Do you wonder if LinkedIn could really work for you kind of business? Maybe you're already active on the platform, but struggle to see how you can use it to generate engagement and sales for your business.

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In this podcast episode, you'll hear from four business owners, who've built an engaged following on the platform. They have a variety of businesses, both product and service base. And you'll hear from Faye Wallace. Who's a career coach, Gus, Bandol a social media expert, Dora Ford, a tailor and designer and talks quote. Who's a virtual assistant. You'll also hear from our room host and McGinley.

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Who's a podcasting expert and producer by the way, Faye and Dhara are current or former clients of mine. So you can imagine how proud it made me to be able to invite people. I taught content strategy to, to speak about content at one of my virtual events. You're listening to the courageous content podcast. I'm Janet Murray, and I love helping coaches,

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creatives and entrepreneurs create super engaging content that generates leads and sales for their businesses. No one starts a business and just knows how to create engaging content. It's a skill that has to be learned from practice, and there's always something new to learn, no matter how long you've been in business. And I know running an online business can

feel messy, perfectionism,

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fear, self doubts, and other mindset stuff can stop you showing up online in the way that's best for you. So you'll get help with that too. Where did you get courageous with your content? Let's get started That starts off end Surrey today. We're going to be hearing from Fay Wallis. She's a career coach and outplacement specialist, and she's the founder of bright sky career coaching.

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She helps her clients to have successful and fulfilling careers and is the important bit without having to work themselves into the ground, That lovely introduction and talking about LinkedIn grave. I thought, how am I going to fit this into five minutes? So I decided to look through all of my pies from the last couple of years and try and find what one key thing I could share with you.

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And so I realized that the most successful posts I've created all had one thing in common and that is storytelling. And the reason that I think that the storytelling paste it so well is because people love a good story. We've always loved stories, right? From the Dawn of time when we were caveman painting our stories on the sides of the cave cable or sitting around the fire together,

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telling each other stories. But if you're thinking well, that's all very wealthy faith. You might be able to tell stories, but icons, I'm not a story storyteller, or I don't know how to write them. It's not going to work, but I'm just going to very gently tell you that you're wrong because actually we're all storytellers. You just might not have noticed it yet.

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If you think back to when you were little and you came home from school and told your parents all about the person who was sitting next to you, or perhaps recently, now that you're a grown up, you found yourself going out for dinner or drinks with family and friends and telling them a story about what or your business, or perhaps you all loved about the story.

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About a crazy thing. A celebrity has been up to. They are all examples of stories. The big trick to storytelling on LinkedIn is noticing there is stories all around us, just knowing that you can move from your posts, say to bring this story to life, I thought it would be helpful to tell you about three different kinds of storytelling place that I've used all done well that you can use to.

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So the first one is the most easy one to use and that's their client success story. So this is just an alternative to sharing a testimonial. You want to think about starting off with what the client's problem was, how you help them resolve it and what the result is now. So, as an example, a couple of months ago, I shared a story about my client Gemma.

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She came to me for coaching because she wasn't sure whether to go ahead and leave her job and set up a nature towards this. But as a result of the coaching, she decided to go for it. So I wrote a post telling her story and about what a success her business had been. And I shared the link to people to book onto her tours if they wanted to.

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So that's the facts kind of paste. And I would say that's probably the easiest one. The second kind of post is to share a personal story that's on directly linked in with what your client's problem might be or talk about any links in with whatever blog you're trying to share and get people to read or whatever the podcast is. You want them to listen to or whatever the service is.

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You want them to sign up to now possible stories can feel the hottest because you're sharing something deeply personal sometimes about yourself. And it may be that you just want to use these sparingly. So for an example, this week, I shared a personal story. I wanted to encourage people to listen to my latest podcast episode. That's all about supporting women returning to work after a career break or maternity leave.

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Now that is something I can share my own experience though, because I've been in that situation. And I remember how tough it felt. It was a long time ago. Now it was 15 years ago, but I had my baby, but I shared the story of my experience of returning to work. And I finished it off by saying, oh, I wish that they had been supports and resources to support me.

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And then I linked him to the podcast episode. I also shot a fights out with myself, with my baby from all that time ago. And that's another tip to say, but often stories used in conjunction with powerful photos can really have a big impact. So moving on to the third and final kind of storytelling piece that I'm going to talk to you about today,

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this is probably my favorite kind of storytelling posts. It's the easiest one to do it. Doesn't have to feel personal. And it doesn't mean talking about your clients all the time. This is looking for examples of everyday life and thinking of how you can weave them into a story to give you an example. A couple of months ago, I had a podcast episode that was all about dealing with difficult people at work.

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And I just couldn't think about what to post, but I was out for lunch on holiday and death. And with my family talking into my delicious salad when it started crawling across the lattice. So I screened away from the table. I was very undignified, but almost straight away. I thought I've got the story from my place. So I wrote the piece like this.

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I said, as I was talking in my crispy noodle and salmon salad, something suddenly moved dot, dot dot. And so it just builds up the anticipation that made people wants to click on the, see more button, which then means that LinkedIn shows the posts to more people. And I talked about the fact that I couldn't wait to eat that salad.

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It was really appetizing, but in seeing as a market started crawling across it, I lost all my episodes. I didn't want to have anything to do with it anymore. And I tied that in by saying, that's how it can feel at work. You go from loving your job and you can't wait to be there every day to suddenly having to deal with a difficult person.

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And the shine goes from your job and you find yourself not wanting to go anymore. So from that, I was able to link into my podcast episode and encouraged people to listen to that. So hope that that really quickly at three different kinds of storytelling posts is helpful for you. And now we move to Coventry and Gus van dowel. He's a social media strategist for service-based business owners and helps you,

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them make the most of digital marketing to maximize the business growth. And he promises that he can help you really tell your story and not just do the boring sales stuff. So no pressure goes no boring stuff. My name's Gus. And I like to think that I'm really good at LinkedIn. Now, when Johnny sent me the presentation, how not to be boring on LinkedIn,

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I wrote loads of notes and I realized that they were incredibly boring. However, that's kind of the point because most people shy away from LinkedIn and they kind of say, oh, you know, it's two business units coming from a business to business platform. And I can't be myself and all that kind of stuff. Well, you should. That's the most important thing you should be as phase already talked about storytelling.

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You should tell your story. You just tell the world about who you are. And don't worry about those people that say this is on Facebook. So when we talk about how not to be boring on LinkedIn, I always look at content. So if you're going to get started on LinkedIn, or if you want to grow on LinkedIn, the main thing is,

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think about your content pillars. I have two content pillars. Make people think, make people laugh. Now when I make people think it shows authority. So I talk about, you know, have you got LinkedIn document yet? Or what do you think of creative mode? Or have you got links to cause on Instagram or, oh, you look at mark Zuckerberg changing the name of Facebook,

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the parent company, not the actual app. And you talk about that and it makes people think, and it makes people think about social media makes people think about what they're doing day to day, et cetera. But it also shows any available authority from me because I know what I'm talking about when it comes to social media. Now the other content pillar is made people laugh.

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Now that's more of the ad hoc stuff. That's like, Hey, look, I just drove past her on my lap. Or, you know, I'm on zoom and I'm not wearing any trousers. Don't ask me to stand up and it's that kind of stuff. But it's the personable stuff. Now make people think is the authority stuff, make people love is the personalities.

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Now think about the people you work with and all of your clients or suppliers, et cetera. I'm pretty sure that you've got to know them. And when you've got to know them, it means that over time you've built trust with those people. Now that's the whole point of telling stories on LinkedIn and obviously writing from the heart and telling people about who you are,

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et cetera. It's to get people to trust you as the cliche goes, you know, people buy from people. And the reason we use that patient is because it's true. If we think about Richard Branson or Elon Musk or bill gates, et cetera, they're all the face of their business. And they've all got more followers than the businesses that they own.

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LinkedIn is all about a long-term content marketing strategy. Now I know that sounds really dull and really boring, but the main thing is you have to be consistent. You'll be regular, be consistent. Tell people about what you're doing, whether you go networking or you took your dog for a walk or listen to the latest podcast in between while you're telling people,

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you know, you're going to sell it, right? You're going to tell people what you do for a living. Oh, I do this, I sell this. Here's my latest offer. Here's my latest product, et cetera. And it's all a story that builds up about you based around those content pillars that make people get to know you get to like you and get to trust you.

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And that's the most important. The main thing is building trust with people now as humans, we're very fickle and we're very selfish. So when you tell these stories, as phase already alluded to, when I have a title, take the reader on a journey and all that kind of stuff, but get people to the end and get people to essentially have a call to action.

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Like you can either call me or you can DM me, or you can go for a walk with me or come and look after my dog for me, you know, whatever it may be, get people to trust you enough to want to get in touch with that's the important thing. And particularly on LinkedIn, most people post stuff, and it's just like a daily blog or like a diary.

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Make sure you have a call to action at the end. The important thing about being regular and consistent on LinkedIn is to make sure that you stay at the forefront of people's minds. I think the official stat is only, I think there's only 3% or 2% of the 800 million users on LinkedIn actually post on a consistent basis. I'm going to say consistent. I'm talking about once a week.

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So if you start posting a minimum of once a week on LinkedIn, you're already better than 98% of other LinkedIn users. And the main thing is you stay on the forefront of the audience mind. So every time you're posting, whenever they're ready, they'll contact you as opposed to contact somebody else. I've just got a very small thing here. A bit of homework for you.

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If you're on LinkedIn, go and introduce yourself. I know you probably already do it. I know everybody on Instagram. Does it take a selfie, go play on LinkedIn, write a few words. If anybody wants to connect with me on LinkedIn, go have a look. I've got an introductory post, which basically says, look, I don't drink.

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I eat going to kebabs. I support Liverpool FC and all this other kind of stuff. And then going into the, oh, by the way, I've got 25 years of marketing periods, et cetera. I added the selfie. It's one of my most popular posts anyway. So the important thing is, tell a story, tell the world who you are,

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tell the world what you do and make sure there's a call to action. Thank you very much, Gus. So let's move now further north from Coventry and talks coil. She's a virtual assistant that provides PA admin and techie services to create us coaches on social enterprises. And she's worked in industries as varied as accountancy security and arts and culture. Hi everyone.

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My name is tox. I'm a virtual assistant. I've actually been on LinkedIn for a whole 10 years. I've just realized, which is quite long. And I just joined mainly just to start with my career and stuff. But yeah, like we started using it for business when I'm starting my business five years ago, I'm going to say there, isn't all good information out there about how to use LinkedIn.

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People do have different opinions, so how to do things on it. So it can be a little bit overwhelming or you're not sure what to go for. So I think it's just important to learn things and then maybe try things out, see what works for you really? Because once you're really comfortable with a certain set of methods that will be best for you.

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You should hopefully get results, be it as authentic to yourself as possible. So I'll say it's important to have a good headline. So just say like your job title or just your company, because that's, doesn't really attract people much. And then especially if you just say CEO of whatever company it's like, oh, well, does that company do training?

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Just kind of have a line of like, you know what you do do it basically. I'm going to say example because I want, she got it. My headlight was new and I know that's not something that everyone knows what that means. It's like a Nigerian phrase means, but people who do that, it's like, oh, I like your headline.

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And then people are like, oh, what's up mean outside? That's something that you can put your like culture in it. Yeah. Just help himself to stand up basically. And then in terms of, so it's important to post consistently. It doesn't have to be every single day, cause that can be overwhelming, but as much as possible. It's good.

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Anyway, you can at least do a few times a week. And probably some of what I'm saying might overlap with what other people are saying, but yeah, storytelling is, where's a good way to sell yourself. Sell space are important as well. Make sure you do them still. Don't see, you want to sell your business. So what you do,

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you want people to know what you do, but then there's the whole thing about people want to buy from people as well. So if you can show a bit of your personality, show a bit, a bit about the person behind the business, things like that, obviously have your own comfort levels about what you're comfortable to share. But if you think,

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oh, people might resonate with the story, just share it, you know, because I'm struggling career journey. So I've told tidbits of that. Other people been like, oh, I really relate to that. And whatnot. And then I like when other people, like there is stories like that. So it helps me think, oh, that's something I can really relate to.

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Even their stuff I can really resonate. So just things like that. And it just helps to attract your tribe as well because they say your vibe, attraction prime, and then obviously your sales post post testimonials as well. So these screenshots of testimonials that you've received, just post pictures of them. So, you know, there's your social proof. And also post that I've done is basically because we've learned through assistance.

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Not everyone really, even nowadays, not everyone knows where it is. I know it's getting a bit more popular. So, and then even then there's a lot of us that do lots of different things as well. So last year was right in a weekly post about like basically what tasks I did for clients that week. So say something like, oh,

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I did write enough newsletter for this client. I did some social media posts. I did a bit email management. I just say, this is what I did. And then that helps give a picture about what sort of tasks I can do for them, really what one VA can do for them. So, and that's actually helped me get work as well because I'm on incoming clients come to me and say like,

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oh, I saw that you do this. Can you do this for me? So yeah, I think that's a really good thing as well to do it, especially if you're from a profession that people don't quite understand. So yeah, that's my key tips there. So we'd go back down to Surrey now for our final speaker of this session and Dara Stringham,

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Dara is a woman's bespoke tailor with an amazing muscle. There is no perfect size, only the perfect fit. And what I really like about her is initially she was a LinkedIn re-issues Nick, but she took advice from a woman called Janet Marie, embraced the platform in 2019 and has since been using LinkedIn to share her work and behind the scenes insights with great success.

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And she's about to launch her first, ready to wear styles as well. It's really great to be here and I'm probably the most surprised person to be a LinkedIn expert. I wouldn't call myself that at all. So I think I'm really here to share on how imperfect action can also get your results. I don't follow an exact posting strategy. I'm quite organic and how I approach my social media,

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but I found it really fun. So obviously the topic today is LinkedIn, how to make LinkedIn not boring. And I think that was my biggest fear when I started using it. I thought LinkedIn is only business to business. It's only people who are looking for jobs or for recruiters. It's not going to work for me who has both a service, but also a product to sell and having followed Janet's advice.

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I did give it a go and I found it to be really fun. So there's a couple of things that I love about LinkedIn. One is you can get stuck in and raise your profile without actually having to post anything yourself. So if you are a bit of an introvert and you don't know where to start, just

start by commenting on other people's posts.

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Find the ones that you think are interesting and leave a comment that shows up as your own activity. So it's a really easy way to get going without having to actually come up with some sort of content strategy in the initial stages. And you will learn your learn from other people. You'll learn to say, what makes me stop scrolling through, why do I click on the read more?

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What was it that hooked me in? And those things are ideas that you can then copy for your own content in terms of what works really well for me, because I do have a product and I have a lot of images I can share sharing behind the scenes processes always get really great engagement. So if I post a time-lapse of me cutting out a garment,

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or I show some small citing process that always makes people stop scrolling, they ask a question or they just say, wow, this is so different from everything else I'm seeing, it just made me stop. So it's a great way to get conversations going. They don't have to be perfect, but again, there's so much text-based content on LinkedIn that if you have a photo to share again,

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it just grabs people's attention and then they will stop and read what you have to say. And you can then have almost like a mini article. You can share a tip, you can share your process. And again, people will just start talking to you in terms of sales. We can often say, I don't want to be too salesy and I don't want to share my content.

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And all of that, the point is nobody likes to be sold to, but we all like to buy. And so LinkedIn is full of people, it's businesses, but it's mainly people. And if you have products or services and you share those, the right people will come across them, I think. And they'll just stop and think, oh yeah,

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I do have, you know, my mom's birthday coming up and that would be perfect for her. So don't be afraid to share products if you have them. And I think also people are nosy. So if you do share something about your personal life, what's been going on, people do like to jump in with a comment or share an experience that they had as well.

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So one of my recent posts was actually over the half-term holiday. I went away with my family and we stayed in an Airbnb. On the second day, we discovered that there were bed bugs, yuck. So we had to pack up everything and get out of there as quickly as we could. And the point I was making with that, and it ties in a bit to what Faye was saying about telling a story.

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But customer service from the host was just dreadful. If he had been responsive, if he had cared, it could have turned a bad experience into a good one. And I could have shared about how great he was. Unfortunately he wasn't, but it kind of allowed me to open up a conversation about customer service and how you can turn bad situations around.

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And it got loads of engagement. What does that have to do is tendering nothing, but it does get me out there. It gets people to stop and talk to me and then they might look at my profile and then look at some of the other things I've been posting. And maybe my final reason for loving LinkedIn is that it is actually crawled by Google and it helps improve your SEO.

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So I think I have found that ever since I started using LinkedIn more actively, my website hits have been going up as well, and I get more bookings for consultations and so on through my website. And I'm pretty sure it's linked to LinkedIn because if I post about tailoring and share my processes on LinkedIn, those keywords are being picked up and linked to my Google profile and you can also cross share testimonials and so on.

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So it's just a really easy platform to learn. I find it easier than some of the other ones. Instagram is quite, you know, yes, you can use stories to be more ad hoc, but I think in terms of the grid, you just feel under pressure to always have that beautiful photography and that kind of thing. So LinkedIn is just easier.

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And that way, if you don't feel like posting, just go hop on comment on other people, it will still drive your own engagement. How many times is the ideal to post on LinkedIn? And I might say, Oh, interesting. I was going to say, per week I saw the comment about posting four times a day. Don't do that.

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That's ridiculous. You will never say for really engaging things in a date. And I'm not saying that you're boring. I'm just saying that's impossible to do that on LinkedIn, even icon do that. Basically I post three times a week on LinkedIn. I recommend don't post more than once a day and try not to post less than once a week. So as a minimum,

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once a week, as a maximum once a day, that's my recommendation. But I personally do three times a week. I think that's brilliant advice from Gus. So the reason I love LinkedIn, I, for other platforms, one of them is the fact that as Gus mentioned only about 2% of active users post consistently. So it means that your posts are much more likely to be seen then on the really busy platforms like Instagram.

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So I actually only post once a week, which feels really manageable for me. I know I can commit to that. There have been times when I've pasted more like if I've got a launch coming up on my pace, then three times a week, but you find that your paste turns around in a way that it doesn't on the other platforms. So I posted on Monday,

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but I know that I will still be getting likes and comments on my post today, even though it's a few days later, Just almost a secondary question on that. What's the ratio of story to sales posts. So in those, those posts that you're putting up, how many of them are stories? How many of them almost sales based? Let's say,

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I probably want to Dara actually, cause I know you do a lot of behind the scenes stuff. So I don't really follow a formula actually. But I think about one to five is a good ratio so that you're not selling an every post. Of course, if you have a launch coming up or then you might increase that ratio, but I think you don't want to bore people by saying,

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buy now, buy now, buy now, but you can find different ways of getting them interested in your product and you can engage them in helping you make decisions. And I think you all have examples of where Janet has done that, helping her choose the covers for her diaries and that kind of thing. I did the same when I was trying to choose colors from my scarves that I was printing and just getting people interested that way right now is my ready to wear.

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Again. I just shared behind the scenes, what was going on that I was visiting the factory and it just gets people interested. And before I'd even said that they can buy this stuff, people were like, well, how do I get this? When can I buy it? And then you can go back in the comments and answer, and you can either give them a link to sign up to your newsletter.

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Or if you have a link where they can buy something, then you can pop it in that way. So it happens quite organically. And that's the nice thing about LinkedIn. I think it kind of combines with the questions about tests from Josephine who says, how do you do sales posts? Because the story posts go a long way, but my sales posts don't get engagement.

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So I wonder if any of the speakers could give any tips for those sales posts to get more engagement. I can give a tip if you like, find if I don't do sales posts, I'm not sure if that's very helpful or not. So instead I'll try and draw someone into my email list and then sells them through that. Instead I have done a couple of sales posts,

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but even if I have got good engagement, I've got the engagement because I've made them story posts at the same time. And so normally what I'll do, here's something free. If you sign up to my email list and then I'm kind of nurturing them. I don't do a coaching session now, but that doesn't necessarily mean that I'm right. That's just because I haven't cracked so much way of doing great sales pastes.

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It might be that it's our talk. So Gus have got a really great way of doing it. No. So I was going to completely agree with you because that's exactly what the idea of LinkedIn is that you optimize your profile. So it tells the world what you do. So you don't really need to tell them again. Then you curated the audience that wants to listen to what you have to say.

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And remember LinkedIn is the only place where you get to curate the perfect audience, and then you create content that they want to read. Now that content, technically everything's a sales post, but I say, Hey, look at this testimonial. Somebody gave me or Hey, look at me going networking or, Hey, look at me speaking at Jenny Morrie's event,

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you know, et cetera, it's all a sales pitch because you're always telling people, this is what I do. And it's all about building that trust, as opposed to saying, Hey, I'm a social media manager and I'll charge 400 pound a month to write a few Facebook posts. It doesn't work like that because most people just switch off. What they want to know is who you are when you're like,

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you know, building trust and all that kind of stuff. Of course saying to add, basically, it's still good to do the sales posts, even if they're not as engaging. I think the only reason for that is that you can't be having a conversation. Like someone just says, oh, this is my package for blah, blah, blah four,

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for whatever pounds. You know, there's not really much people are going to talk about that. They might like your price, but that's it. But you still do them anyway because people will still, they'll still buy from you when they're ready. So it's always good to just give them that reminder of what you do. It's still just important to do both sorts of posts.

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Brilliant. Carla's asked, are there any resources you can recommend for getting into that frame of mind where you're thinking of stories because she has a mental block, you know, the famous one is writer's block. How we follow that thing where you just don't know what to say, any tips that you would give on how to generate that. I think somebody mentioned in the comments about Robin Kennedy,

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kind of the, the advice, think about the least boring thing you did that day and write about it. I love that. I imagine everybody is got the Janet Murray content planner and that's full of stuff that you can post every day. You know, it's full of stuff and full of ideas that everything that you do from drinking to making a coffee in the morning,

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having breakfast, taking your kid to school, et cetera, it's all content because it's all personable because it's all talking about what you do day to day. Everything is real life. And I've got a big note here that says resonate. So it's all about resonating with other people. So you can talk about vaccines or how much we hate Boris Johnson and all that kind of stuff.

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Some of those kind of stuff is contentious to the point where you like to your coffee, or how do you have your coffee? Now that's a little bit boring, but so what about resonating with the audience? So technically everything around you is content, but if you ever get writer's block, you know, obviously there's the Janet Murray diary, have a look through,

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just think about what you've been doing over the past seven days or 14 days or whatever, et cetera. Think about your clients. Think about your suppliers, think about what they're going through. There's just so much out there. I totally agree. And now we would all say, say actually, if I'd had more than five minutes, I had whole bit already scripted out about this,

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which was to give yourself time off of work, because to be creative, you have to give yourself free time. And that's something I really struggle with those words from my first few years of business. Cause I was just pushing myself so hard. It felt like a half day at my desk all the time wa but actually what I've found is all the best stories I've shared.

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I've thought about them when I've been on holiday or when I've been out walking the dog, it's got to be a time where you can just switch off from everything else. So actually some of my best ones are coming up in cleaning the bathroom and I'll make sure that I won't listen to a podcast. You have to just give yourself empty brain time. And then I make sure that I have the notes section of my phone with me and the minute something Pops my head,

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but just quickly put it in the notes section because otherwise I forget. So that's how, Yeah, I might just share something quickly here as well. So I was talking to Gastonia because I used to do the breakfast show in Coventry, RAICES, and I learned very quickly that the demand concept was so great. But if I stayed in the studio all day working on it and in the office,

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it was always much harder. One of the best shows I have a date came after, I just went out for some lunch and walks into the brand new Ikea. They built at the time, right in the city center. And I had done three days worth of material about the experience of going around Ikea and everything that generated the interactions I had with people.

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And it's just sometimes just that change of scenery and moving away from that block just really opens up some of the resources as well. Right. So let's see. So there's a great one from Nicole. If I'm posting on LinkedIn and the same content on Facebook or Instagram or on my website, will it work against each other? I've not really seen much advice against it,

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to be honest, I repurpose stuff. To be honest, I don't really post on my Facebook page that much. Anyway, I'll put the same thing. If that big 10 that'd be short version on Twitter. So even with Twitter, anyway, there's a function on LinkedIn where you can write a post and it posts on Twitter the same time. So I often do that as well.

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Although it won't actually put the whole fake bill per snippet and then link to your LinkedIn post. Yeah. I tend to share things across different platforms. The only place where you might need to be careful as with blogs. So I know there was another question about sharing blogs on LinkedIn. I think it is best if you copy all the texts and then share it as an article in its own right on LinkedIn.

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And I might be wrong on this, but I think it's best if you wait two weeks so that Google can kind of attribute it as your own content first and then realize that you're copying or resharing it rather on LinkedIn. So just leave a two week delay and then you can do that. But I think I've seen other people very successfully share tweets. For example,

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they just screen grabs them as images and then share those on Instagram and then again on LinkedIn and add in text. So I think it's actually easier to reshare content and use it across different platforms. I think we just tend to make it more complicated than it has to be. So yes I do share on all the different platforms and I haven't seen that.

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It's negative in any way. I hope this episode has given you tons of ideas for using LinkedIn to promote your business. And just to remind reminder that you heard from Faye Wallis, who's a careers coach, Gus, Bhandal a social media pro Dora Stringham. Who's a tailor and designer and Toks Coyle, a virtual assistant and of course. You heard from our room host,

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podcasting expert and McKinley. I'm sure they would all love you to connect with them on LinkedIn. If you enjoyed this episode, I'll put a link to their profiles in the show notes and my own, because I'd love to hear from you on LinkedIn. T would you like to create super engaging content about business and to it consistently? If so you need my courageous content planet in your life.

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It's a gorgeous A4 desk diary. That's so simple to use because it's based on my four-by-four strategy, which involves posting four styles of content four days a week. Yes, content planning really can be that easy there's templates for daily, weekly, monthly, and annual planning. So, you know exactly what to post where and when plus hundreds of ready-to-go content ideas and forms.

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So you'll never run out of ideas for social media posts again, and accountability trackers to keep you consistent with your posting. The courageous content planner is both practical and pretty with four gorgeous cover designs to choose from. So if you want to ditch the content overwhelm and you want a simple content plan, you can actually stick to head over to courageouscontentplanner.com to order your copy today.

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Thanks for listening to the courageous content podcast. If you enjoyed this episode, please leave a review on apple podcast or share the episode on social media. That way more people can benefit from the free tips and strategies I share and be sure to tag me in when you do I'm at Jan Murray on Instagram, Twitter, and TikTok.

About the Podcast

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Courageous Content with Janet Murray
Content marketing advice for small businesses

About your host

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Janet Murray

I’m Janet Murray and I’ve helped thousands of coaches, creative and entrepreneurs learn how to create engaging content – so they can build their online audience and make more sales in their business.

I’m also a podcaster and keynote speaker who has spoken all over the world about content marketing and building online audiences.

Work with me and I’ll teach you the strategies I’ve used to grow a multi six figure online business, selling digital products (including Ebooks, online courses and two membership sites). And launch a physical product – the Social Media Diary & Planner, which has sold thousands of copies, all over the world.