Episode 131

Should you put prices on your website as a small business owner?

Transcript

IMPORTANT: THIS TRANSCRIPT IS AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED. WE GIVE IT A QUICK CHECK THROUGH BUT WE DON’T CORRECT EVERYTHING AS IT’S INTENDED TO HELP YOU FIND PARTS YOU WANT TO LISTEN TO AGAIN - NOT AS AN EXACT TRANSCRIPT. SO THERE MIGHT BE A FEW QUIRKY WORDS/PHRASES HERE!

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A few years back. I booked, I just love, recall where the cage I was interested in working here. I love chatting to her and the program sounded great until we got to the big reveal about the price. It was 10,000 pounds, and this is no reflection on her abilities. I just didn't have the budget at the time. And although I tried to hide it,

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the call ended on a bit of an awkward night with me promising to think about it and her promising to catch up with me in a few days, neither of which happened. I'm Janet Murray. I'm a content and online business strategies. And in this episode of the courageous content podcast, I answer a question. I get asked a lot. Should you put your prices on your website?

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So how would things have been different if this cage had included her prices on her website, has her price has been on her websites or at least on the literature she sent out before the call. I think both of us could have saved ourselves an hour of time and some embarrassment. And no, I didn't ask beforehand. I'm far too British for that. And I don't think I'm alone.

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I share this story because I speak to lots of business owners who say they can't possibly put their prices on their website, that the price might put people off before they've even had a chance to convince a prospective client how amazing they are. Plus they tell me they don't want their competitors to see their prices in case they undercut them and when all their business,

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and they typically also claim they couldn't possibly create pricing packages to share with prospective clients before getting on a call because every client has different needs and I don't buy any of that at all. And this is why I believe you shouldn't get on a call with anyone without sharing your pricing. First, number one, most people have a budget in mind for any product or service,

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depending on the price point. There might be a bit of wiggle room, a few hundred pounds perhaps, but there is nothing you can say on any discovery call that will convince someone to go or vastly over budget. And if you do, then it's very likely they will be back a few days later, or maybe even a few hours later asking for a refund because they have a serious case of buyer's remorse.

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Number two, if your competitors really wants to know how much you charge, they can easily do so. Even if your price is only on your website, they can hose as a prospective client. They can get a mate to ask or their cousin or their business bestie. These things really aren't too hard to find out. And that's for the claim that many people make that they can't put their prices on their website because there's a service is too complex.

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It's too bespoke. It's just not possible to give even a guideline price of what their service will offer. Well, for me, that suggests they've got a business problem because when you've nailed your niche, you should be able to create a package out of absolutely any service because people typically ask for help with the same things over and over again. And if you've put your package together correctly,

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there will be plenty of flexibility to tailor to individual needs. And if you're struggling to create a package, that's usually assigned your niche is too broad. So if you're not doing so already being upfront about your pricing will free you up to have conversations with qualified leads, who are serious about your products and services and avoid wasting time on tire-kickers, who just want to pick your brain for free.

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And if you've never thought about creating content for a little bit, you really need to listen to my episode on how to launch a one-to-one service, because you do need to launch a coaching or consultancy package, and you do need to launch done for you or done with you services in your business, which means you need to create a plan and you need to create content.

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I'll link to that episode in the show notes, I'll also link to my business basics content cat, because it contains templates, not only for putting together offers for coaching and consultancy packages, and also done with you and done for you services, but it also creates all of the content that you would need to launch. One of these services, including email templates for booking sales calls,

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following up sales calls, sending out offers and proposals. And that's not the type of content you typically hear content marketing experts like myself talking about, but nevertheless, it's super important. And if you're not creating content like that at the moment, and you're struggling to sell your services, this could be why. So I linked to my business basics content kits in the show notes too.

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And speaking of websites, that also includes a template for writing and about page or your website, which should definitely include information about your pricing.

About the Podcast

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Courageous Content with Janet Murray
Content marketing advice for small businesses

About your host

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Janet Murray

I’m Janet Murray and I’ve helped thousands of coaches, creative and entrepreneurs learn how to create engaging content – so they can build their online audience and make more sales in their business.

I’m also a podcaster and keynote speaker who has spoken all over the world about content marketing and building online audiences.

Work with me and I’ll teach you the strategies I’ve used to grow a multi six figure online business, selling digital products (including Ebooks, online courses and two membership sites). And launch a physical product – the Social Media Diary & Planner, which has sold thousands of copies, all over the world.