Episode 7

How TikTok blew up my business (and helped me find my niche).

When the UK went into Lockdown, wedding pianist Nicole Reynolds had to look for alternative ways to generate income for her business.

So she turned to TikTok - a social media app she’d previously dismissed as being for teenagers dancing and lip syncing.

In this interview, you’ll find out how Nicole grew her TikTok following to more than 70k in just six months. And how it’s helped her find new sources of income - along with a new (and unexpected) niche.

Key moments

[2:38] How the TikTok algorithm works 

[3:34] Why wedding pianist Nicole started using TikTok 

[4:10] How Nicole found content ideas for TikTok in the early days

[7:54] Nicole’s ‘breakthrough’ TikTok video that’s had 240k views 

[12:04] Where many businesses go wrong with niche 

[15:35] How Nicole generates income from TikTok

[17:50] Nicole’s advice for business owners getting started on TikTok

[21:00] How long it takes Nicole to plan and create a TikTok video

[22:16] Hashtag strategy for TIkTok 

[23:00] How to tackle TIkTok tech overwhelm

[24:06] Nicole’s experience of haters/trolls - and how she deals with it 

[29.27] Some tough love from me about this podcast episode

Key Links

Janet Murray’s Courageous Content Planner

Janet Murray’s Courageous Podcasting Content Kit

Janet Murray’s Courageous Planner Launch Content Kit

Janet Murray's Courageous Blog Content Kit

Save £30 on my Courageous Email Lead Magnet Content Kit using the code MAGNET67.

Save £30 on my Business Basics Content Kit using the code PODCAST67.

Save £30 on my Courageous Launch Content Kit using the code PODCAST67.

Janet Murray’s Courators Kit

Janet Murray’s FREE Ultimate Course Launch Checklist

Nicole on TikTok

Nicole on Instagram

Nicole on Facebook 

Janet Murray’s website

Janet Murray on Facebook

Janet Murray on Facebook

Janet Murray on LinkedIn

Janet Murray on Twitter

Janet Murray on TikTok

Transcript

IMPORTANT: THIS TRANSCRIPT IS AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED. WE GIVE IT A QUICK CHECK THROUGH BUT WE DON’T CORRECT EVERYTHING AS IT’S INTENDED TO HELP YOU FIND PARTS YOU WANT TO LISTEN TO AGAIN - NOT AS AN EXACT TRANSCRIPT. SO THERE MIGHT BE A FEW QUIRKY WORDS/PHRASES HERE!

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I be kind to yourself about it. Like, who cares if you, your first video and you've got 10 views like I did. You still posted it? When the UK went into lockdown, waiting PNS, Nicole, Wendell's had to look for alternative ways to generate income for her business. So she turned to tick tock, a social media actually previously dismissed as being just for teenagers.

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And lip-syncing, If you go back to the start of my channel, it changed a lot. I tried a lot of different techniques before I found my niche In this interview. You'll find out how Nicole grew her tip top following to over 70,000 in just six months and how it helps her find new sources of income and find a new and unexpected niche. It feels selling awe.

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If you're selling food, anything you want to connect to these people because if they connect to you, they'll come back to you. You'll have loyal customers, loyal followers. You're listening to the courageous content podcast. I'm Janet Murray. And I love helping coaches creatives and entrepreneurs create super engaging content that generates leads and sales for their businesses. No one starts a business and just knows how to create engaging.

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Content is a skill that has to be learned from practice. And there's always something new to learn, no matter how long you've been in business. And I know running an online business can feel messy, perfectionism, fear, self doubts, and other mindset stuff can stop. You're showing up online in the way that's best for you. So you'll get help with that too.

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Ready to get courageous with your content? Let's get started. I hear a lot of people saying that TikTok is it's just for young people doing dance routines. Oh, this is exactly what all I felt funnily enough, but I went on there to share my music and I certainly have not danced for one moment on there. And I have no intention of dancing on Tik TOK initially comes across as an app for people doing silly dances and lips thinking.

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However, it can be really educational, a lot of tutorials. There's a lot of doctors on there, like talking about mental health and physical wellbeing, which I find really great. Like I love seeing that sort of thing. Take talk is an interesting platform in the way that it's quite intense. It's short, short videos, and you want to grab your audience as quickly as possible.

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So if you grab people's attention within the first 30 seconds, I found the longer they will stay and watch your video for which then pushes your video onto other people's view page, which is the result you want. So How would you explain the for you page to someone who hasn't heard that before? So the, for you page is kind of tick tocks equivalent of a home page,

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but it's all content. It thinks you will enjoy. So I believe when you first get tech talk, you have to select your interests. So if you're interested in food and cookery, music, dance, art sports, you select these interests and Tik TOK feeds you videos, they think you'll enjoy. So for me, I obviously I'm very passionate about music.

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So I see a lot of music videos on my, for page. It kind of watches what you're doing and in a non-creepy way, it's just so that you will enjoy the content you're seeing. Because for me, I don't want to see a video about football on my, for you page, because I'm not that interested in football and Tik TOK knows I've never searched for football,

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but I've searched for piano covers vocal covers for production tips. So it feeds me all these videos that I actually really like and want to see, and I discover new creators. So it's great That basically serves you up, what it thinks you're interested in. Exactly. That it's like a personalized home feed of all the things that you will enjoy looking at You've grown to about 72,000 followers.

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What made you decide to get onto TikTok Boredom? Mainly the fact that we were put in yet under the lockdown in the UK from, I think it was start of December because I had a super busy festive season coming up at work. Cause I play piano in hotels and venues and I play for weddings. So I had a really busy festive season coming up and then all of a sudden that was gone.

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So I was like, I need something new to do. And I kept seeing people repost TikToks to Instagram. I keep seeing that Tik TOK logo in the corner. I was like, Hey, I should try it. Did you have a plan or a content strategy? Absolutely not. So I did a lot of full lens covers on Instagram and Facebook for the initial lockdown.

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So I just started posting snippets of them and just like snippets of a cover, I'd done of say house of the rising sun or whatever. And then I started to notice people would occasionally ask for songs and request songs. And I was like, oh, I can do that song. So I started doing little covers there and yeah, it was a kind of a domino effect I think.

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And tell us about your first video. So my first video, which hilariously enough I can remember was a cover of the Pokemon theme song on piano with all my Pokemon teddies around. Cause I liked Pokemon And honestly I think it got about 10 views. So don't ever be disheartened if your first a hundred videos only get a couple of views because persistence really is key.

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And my page didn't do that well in the first month. So how did you come up with ideas for your first post? I started doing a lot of duet MES for singers, a lot of amazing, amazing singers on Tik TOK. And I noticed a lot of them on my, for you page, would you acting other the pianists or guitarists?

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And I thought, Hey, I could do this. So I started doing, you know, singles me to this Whitney Houston song, sing with me to this James bay song and people would start dueting yet, If you're not familiar with TikTok, here's a quick explainer of duets. You can do X and other video in tiptop. This basically means you create a video of you talking about somebody else's video or singing and playing along both your and the video of the person you're getting along with is a physical.

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So what Nicole was essentially doing was providing a mini backing track for people to sing along to takes off videos are currently up to 60 seconds long for most users. Although longer videos are being rolled out. I believe Instagram reels has a similar feature called remix. You can even do at your own videos, which is a great way to repurpose content or create it quickly.

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For example, I recently used the remix feature on Instagram reels to show how I created a transition, which meant I was able to create a helpful tutorial in minutes. And of course other people directing your videos can be a great way to get your accounts in front of a bigger audience. If I was doing songs that were say in the charts or really popular,

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they would get more engagement. And I was like, oh, okay, this is what people want to hear. So I'll keep doing popular songs or songs that people like and people know because people are listening to them and enjoying them. So it sounds like you were learning from your audience, you were putting out content that maybe you had an inkling might work and then you were learning from them.

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Yeah. They've basically given me all the tools I needed and all the ideas from day one with any content you're putting out. If people want to know more, you've just got to feed from that. You've got to take their requests and ideas and fly with it. If somebody has taken the time to comment to ask you to do something, there's probably a lot of other people that also want to see you play that song or sing that song will make that product.

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Does that make sense? Totally. And did you spend any time researching other people's content? Not really. No. I wasn't there. I just went in on a bit of a whim and learn on the job. I just kept looking at my, for you page every now and again and being like, oh, that's cool. That's fun. Maybe I could do that.

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But with piano or in a musical sense. So There was a turning point for you with your Tik TOK. Wasn't that? Tell us about that turning point video. So I've always been really interested in looking at classical songs that maybe sound like what pop songs that take inspiration from classical music. And so I made a video and say maroon five memories was the song,

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great song. It's so catchy because it uses the same chord progression and melody as Canon in D by taco bell, which is a classic oil entrance piece for a wedding. So I made a video about that saying, this is why it sounds so familiar. This is why it's catchy. Did you ever notice that Marine volume memories is a little bit too familiar?

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That's because it was, it's also the same chord progression and same melody give or take as Canon in D, which a lot of people down the aisle to That was coming in a day and this is going to be memories. Some people commented and said, I thought everyone knew this. And some people commented and said, oh my gosh, this is why it's so familiar.

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This makes sense. People were tagging their friends to tell them about this. And that was it for me. I made something that made people want to react. Yeah. And when we were talking on the pre-interview chats, I said, oh, I had that at my wedding. And it's that relate-ability as well. Isn't it? It's about making people actually care about content.

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I think, I think that's it. Isn't it. And chat about it. Somebody wanting to talk to you about this thing you've created and say, oh, I like that. And a few musicians, comments on a few music accounts say, well, everyone knows this. And it's like, well, Hey, they don't be your comments helping me.

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So that's cool commented. And how many views did that one get, I think it's got about 250,000. Now back when I was getting about 2000 per video, well, I started, as I say, I think my first one got 10. All of a sudden go from that to 200,000 was a really big jump for me. So I fed off that and thought,

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okay, this has given me some feedback. What can I create to keep people talking, to keep people interested? So what did you do next? I did quite a few videos where I added key changes to songs. So I lifted the key up just like it does at the end of the Titanic song. When it goes all big, I basically added key changes into songs that don't have key changes in them.

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And again, it, it split people down the middle. I have some people saying, no, this song is perfect. Leave it alone. And I had some people saying, oh my God, this is brilliant. Why isn't this in the original song? So that was something I worked on for a while. And then I really feel like I hit my niche.

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So I'm a wedding pianist and I created a wedding I'll entrance for if Ariel from the little mermaid was to walk down the aisle. I did this by putting again Pachelbel's Canon and D seems to be an, all my good videos, packer Bell's Canon and D into two popular little mermaid songs, which were part of your world and kiss the girl. And I said,

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Hey, if Ariel was to walk down the aisle, this is what it would sound like. And people just loved it Ariel and had an aisle entrance that her wedding, it would've sounded like this It became a domino effect. Almost people were like, oh my God, what would Belle from beauty and the beast, walk down the aisle to what would Harry Potter walk down the aisle to what would pardon me from star wars walked down the aisle to,

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and all of a sudden people want it to hear these islands who says, all I had to do was make them. So the fans and the followers helped me. Yeah. So your audience told you basically What content they wanted you to create through their feedback? Well, you paid upon here is something really important. I think a lot of business owners really struggle with niche and it's like,

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I have to decide my knee. So I'm going to decide, this is my niche. This is what I'm going to create content about. This is what I'm going to sell. And something that I find myself saying to clients over and over again, is your niche often finds you and often it's that thing that keeps tapping you on the shoulder because maybe you don't even want to do it.

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Or maybe you're like, no, no one would be interested in that. But yeah. Asking, and it feels like your niche found you. Yeah, Absolutely. It was just an idea I had in my head where I thought we don't see that many characters walk down the island, Disney. I wonder what they'd walked down the aisle to because I play at weddings because I've played hundreds of rides down the aisle,

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probably because I was missing planning at weddings due to the pandemic. I've done a lot of Disney ones. I've done a lot of film and TV ones. And now he's actually gone off on a slightly different route where people are asking me if that they've got a family member or a friend that has suddenly passed away and they want to feel like they're at their wedding.

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Can you do Canon and Dee or here comes the bride into my best friend's favorite song who suddenly no longer with us into my father's favorite song. So it feels like my father's walking me down the aisle, even though he can't music has the ability to bring back so many memories. So I create these ideas for people and I mash the father's favorite song with a wedding I'll entrance song.

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So they can walk down the aisle and have their loved one as a part of their special day. Yeah. This is just so, so important because when I'm talking to small business owners and they're saying, I don't know what suppose I don't know how to attract my ideal customers or clients. And I'll often say your content needs to connect with people emotionally.

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And clearly does most content. I see business contact, doesn't connect with people emotionally. It needs to make them feel something. And that's something that they feel might actually be, well, it might be that what you've created is divisive and they disagree or they're riled or that upset, but it's got to make them feel something. And I feel like so much business content doesn't make people feel something.

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So you could have got out there and just posted videos of you playing and say, look at how cool I am. I play at the supplier. I've played here where they're looking at betting on people probably be like, Hey, that's nice. You made it about your audience. I mean, that's certainly how it comes across to me. When I went into it professionally and I started playing in hotels and restaurants and for weddings,

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all of a sudden, it's not about you. You're not practicing at home on your own. You're playing to a room full of people who want to hear their favorite song will want to hear a song that brings back beautiful memories. And I think that's what I tried to channel with. Take talk. And I think when you're selling a product, whether it be for me,

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I'm selling myself as a musician. If you're selling or if you're selling food, anything you want to connect to these people because if they connect to you, they'll come back to you. You'll have loyal customers, loyal followers. They'll tell you what they want. If you look in your comment section, I guarantee no matter how small or big you are as a creator,

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people will be asking you for things. And if you give them what they want, I think it's such a great way to go. Do you feel it's easier for you as a performer and a musician to put yourself out there? Yes, possibly because I've, I've got my piano to hide behind. Like that is my armor almost if it was just me talking,

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for example, the videos I do, where I am talking, I do get quite nervous about those because that isn't my forte, my forte is playing the piano. It can be quite scary, but I feel like if you're passionate about it and you believe in it, you've just got to do it. Can you talk about the outcome in terms of sales?

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Yeah. So I've got quite a few wedding and private events bookings just through my tech top following, which is great. People reach out old people, go to my Instagram and message mail. People, email me, I record trucks at home for fees. So people contact me about tracks. I take them on as, and when I can, for example,

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right now, my email is not in my bio because I'm too busy, which is crazy. But I obviously earn money from all of that because it's all very well posting videos online, but yes, we've all got to pay our bills. We've all got to eat. So for me, this is become income by getting booked for events, by creating tracks for people,

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and also on the lives. You get these things on lives called gifts, and they think once you're at 15, 15 pounds, you can download that money into your PayPal account. That's extra money coming in there. When you get to 10 K in certain areas of the world, the UK being one of them, you get into the Tik TOK creator fund.

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So you get a little bit of money everyday for your videos, if they're doing well. Yeah, it's only a pound or two a day sometimes, but it really adds up at 10,000 followers. I actually was approached by the learn on Tik TOK campaign and got paid a lump sum for doing piano tutorials. And I was only at 10,000 then, which in the grand scheme of things,

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isn't a huge amount of followers, but I was still paid. And that really helped me out in locked down to be paid this decently lump sum of money to make some piano tutorials. So don't ever feel like it's, it's pointless. I think it can definitely work its way into work. Yeah. That makes so much sense. And I'm guessing that there will be people listening who will be thinking,

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well, this is all very well, but Nicole plays the piano and people love music. And what I have to sell is just not that interesting. My product or service. I can't make beautiful songs for people whose parents have just died or for them to walk up the aisle to can this still work for me? Can I still create engaging content? Can I still make a platform like tip-top work for me?

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What would you say to that person? Oh, I didn't go on there and immediately look at pianists, but I wish I had, because that would have been much easier because I would've seen immediately what was good and what wasn't. So go on and see if you're, you know, I know you, you make candles, you create candles, look at other people that create candles and see what they're doing.

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You could always make videos and keep them in your drafts so you can experiment the videos, keep them in your drafts. And when you're ready, you post them. What about if you haven't got an audience though? So what people will sometimes say as well, I saw you posting on TechTalk, but I'm just not getting that much back. Like I'm not really getting anybody engaging with my videos.

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What thoughts would you have on that? The persistent first and foremost and change it up. If you don't think something's working, try something else. If you go back to the start of my channel, it changed a lot. Like I tried a lot of different techniques before I found my niche at the start. If you look back at my profile, all of my stuff was technically nosediving it wasn't it wasn't getting anywhere.

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And that wasn't because my content was bad. It was just, I was just new to the app. Maybe I wasn't posting at the right times. Maybe I wasn't using the right hashtags. It's something I often say to my clients is people get paid to create content for a living. And now they get paid by people like Tik TOK to create content.

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They get rewarded for being good at it. And it's almost like what makes you think as a business owner that you're going to get onto a new platform and immediately know how to create amazing content. You've got to be a beginner. You've got to learn. And it's just like, I learned the piano and it's like expecting to be a concert pianist without having any lessons or after your first lessons.

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Like you have to do, you have to put the hours in, you have nails, you have to do your patios. You have to practice. You have to do the exams. Unfortunately, some people get to that mastery stage quicker and maybe more easily than others. But I don't think anybody, you can get to be good at something without actually putting in the time.

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And I'm always saying to my clients, remind themselves of that. Like people get paid to create content. It is a job. Give yourself some time and give yourself a chance to get good at it. Yeah. Be kind to yourself about it. Who cares if you, your first video and you got 10 views, like-minded you still posted it. That's more than 50% of people have done so good for you.

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Social media is such a scale. It is a talent that you have to make yourself good at it. I couldn't wake up one morning and be like, I'm going to run a marathon because I haven't put in the training yet. It's exactly the same as social media. Just keep trying things, keep trying things until it works. And it will eventually work.

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Definitely look at your previous work and think, okay, what could I do to improve on this? Or what are the comments saying that people want to hear or see more of? If you create something you're really proud of own it. Even if it gets 10 views, doesn't matter. I was really proud of my Pokemon cover that got 10 views. It's that balance of looking critically,

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but don't beat yourself up about it. If it doesn't get that many views, because sometimes the people that want to see your video just might not be on their phone that day. And for those people who might be feeling a bit scared about TikTok well, what advice would you have about dealing with those nerves? I would say do it in your time,

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do it at your own speed. You could always get it and just look at other people's videos for a month. You haven't got to post anything straight away. Wait until it's the right time for you. If you've posted some cool videos on Facebook and Instagram, you can just reuse those videos, just upload them. So you haven't got a, it's not like a whole new ball game.

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You can repost content. You can take your time with it. You can do it at your own speed and however you want to do it. So how long does it typically take you to plan a TikTok video? It can take me an hour or it can take me 10 minutes. It completely depends on if I've played the song before or how complicated the song is.

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If I'm doing a tutorial, it will take me around an hour because I've got to talk. So I need to draft up a script. So it varies. How often should you be posting on tick-tock? I know everyone says two to three times a day, but that's a lot. I did do two to three times a day throughout the lockdown, but now the work and everything is coming back.

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I try and post once a day and I find that fine. I think once a day is fine, but don't pressure yourself to do it every single day. You know, every other day is just as good as well. Do it, as in when you have the time, keep it regular. There is a lot of advice on Tik TOK. Isn't there to say,

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oh, post three times a day. And once you get to a thousand followers and go live, go live every single day, but that may not be practical. I always think it's better to do one a day, but actually do it rather than promise to do three a day. And then last two days, because you're so busy with other stuff it's just better to be consistent on a timeline that works for you.

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Absolutely. I think one a day is a good amount for me because that means I can sit. For example today this morning I sat and made five tech talks. That's my Monday to Friday worth of tech talks. It's recording them all on one day and then sharing them throughout the week is the method that works for me because then it's not overwhelming. It's not something I've got to do every day.

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I can just do it in one day and share them throughout the week. Fab. And how important are things like hashtags and posting times on tech talk, do you think? I think they definitely help for me. I looked at my analytics and analytics. I can never say that word. I'm so sorry. I looked into it and my followers were mainly online around 9:00 PM.

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So I post around 9:00 PM. It doesn't mean I stick to it strictly. It's just something I occasionally do. Or I try to do my hashtags. I try and post three to four relevant hashtags. So for example, I'm not going to put the hashtag baking when I'm not baking, I'm playing the piano. So I just think relevant hashtags because that's how people will find your content.

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If they're interested in it. And it's all about that target audience. You want people that are interested in your content, not something else that are there from a hashtag. Totally agree. And a lot of people say with Tech-Talk that they feel overwhelmed by just using the app. How did you feel when you first opened TechTalk? I think it took me a little bit of time to figure out how to add text to my videos,

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how to add effects to my videos, go to that plus at the bottom and have a play around you. Don't have to post that everything you create, you could post a video. You could create a video as a trial run playing about with techs, playing about with effects, playing about with speed. And that's how I learned how to edit my videos playing around.

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Yeah, I'm exactly the same. I've always found. The best way to learn is just to get stuck in and do it. There are so many creators on fixed stock who are creating really useful tutorials on how to use textiles. And you can Google anything you're stuck on. There will be a video or a blog post or something out there to help you.

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Absolutely. I'm guessing that you've had some experience of trolls, haters, negative people. Can you talk a little bit about that? As soon as you do at all, people have an opinion on it. It's exactly the same with creating content. They matter how big or small you are. So yeah, you get trolls. I have had people telling me I should give up.

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I should stop playing ball. If I wasn't wearing makeup, I wouldn't get any views,

which was a weird one. Sadly, you remember the negative comments more than the lovely comments that you get all the time. I've had classical musicians, like come onto my lives and be like, thought your posture out. Your posture is terrible. It makes me feel sick.

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And I'm like, I'm playing, I'm playing desperately to him. I conservatory I'll sit how I want. You know, but all I have to think is, well, I'm a musician and I wouldn't go and comment on that stuff. Negatively people will comment something on my video like, oh, this is terrible. You'd get no views. If you weren't wearing red lipstick,

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you know, you're only getting views because you're a female. And I just put, thank you for your comment. Have a wonderful day. And I put a love heart emoji face. I'm not going to argue with you because I'm never gonna win. Cause you got that much hatred in your body that you're just going to hate me regardless. So I'm just going to be nice to you and wish you well on your way that or just ignore.

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It's hard to ignore. Sometimes I find, I feel a bit better if I, if I reply with something nice. The interesting thing is those sorts of people never seem to be doing anything especially interesting on their own accounts or actually publishing any content at all. But they've got so much to say about other peoples. I feel with what you're doing, that you've got a wider mission.

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So it's this mission which is about, about making music more inclusive. Can you talk a bit about that? I started piano lessons really out of the blue. My dad's a window cleaner and he was cleaning ladies conservatory and he saw her teaching someone piano. And he was like, my daughter has got a little keyboard. She messes around on, could she come for piano lessons?

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So I went for piano lessons. I think it was once every two weeks. And then once, every week as I got older and so I didn't fall into it because I was like went to a music school. None of my family are really musical. I fell into it by chance, but it wasn't until I got a little bit older that I almost realized there was a lot of snobbery around it.

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Oh, well, if you can't sight read, you know, Beethoven's fifth and we don't want to talk to you. Or if you haven't been to this music college or got this music grade, then people are quite intimidating sometimes. And it can be seen as like an elite hobby when really it's not, it's just making sounds like it. As long as you've got something to create sounds with,

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you can be a musician. I post a lot of tutorials on my page for people who can't read music, teaching them how to read music or teaching them how to play by ear. That's one of the things I think that me meets your account. Actually, we spoke before we got onto the interview about me really coming from a similar background where I actually do come from a very musical family,

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but nobody's ever studied it properly. Lots of people play and sing very well by ear, but I was the first person to read music. And I, I got a place to read music at Kings college in London, which if you know anything about it, it's a good place to get. It's a good place they're offered and they don't take many people.

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However, there was a turning point for me and it was, there was a, I used to play for my county and I was at this big concert. And even though I wasn't as good as others, that may be weeding the notes or the theory side, I was really musical players. I often used to get picked to do the big solos.

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And I got picked to do this solo and this girl walked up to me and she said, yeah, well, you're not doing it next time because I've already spoken to the music director and I'm doing it because I'm better than you. And I remember it was a turning point because I was like, I was scared about going to music college. I was scared about being around people like that.

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Did I went off and just decided to go and study English instead where I'd be more comfortable. But I felt very, I think I also shared the story of going to Birmingham university and meeting these girls who were telling me they were just using that audition at Birmingham university as

practice for Oxford or Cambridge and just, well, actually I'd really like to come here.

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It seems like the classical music world can feel very, very intimidating. And I just love that you're opening this up and actually demystifying some of it. I love the fact that you're helping to create this even playing field. If you like, It is really, really daunting as you said, and those experiences so sad because if these people had just kept their mouth shut,

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you could have pursued music. And that's really, really sad. And I think that's something I'm focusing on doing. I play at some of the most prestigious hotels in the UK, but I'm at the Savoy. I did play at the Ritz. I played at the Dorchester. I couldn't sit and sight read a piece of music particularly. Well, I like chords and I figure out by ear,

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does that make me pianist? Isn't that good? I don't think so. I think I've just found what works for me. And that's fine. It's like with anything, if you ask professional athletes, for example, do you guys train, do you guys do exactly the same training and exactly the same diet plan? No, but they're both professional athletes,

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but it's not the same in music. We're not there yet. And I think as soon as we stop judging each other for being different is when we will move forward. As musicians they take took is making it better because people are just going on there and showing their creative side and getting hundreds of millions of followers just from sharing that creativity. It doesn't matter how much training you've got.

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Anyone can create an account. I think there is so much wisdom in this interview, but I have to be honest. My worry for you is that you've listened and enjoyed this episode and already decided that it won't work for you because you don't have a cool product or service like Nicole, but that's just not true. There is no such thing as a boring topic,

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only a boring treatments COVID topic. And Nicole is right the best way to find out what kind of content will resonate with your ideal customers or clients is just to put content out there and see what lands with your audience because your audience will tell you what they want to hear from you. As long as you are open to listen. I very much doubt Nicole would have discovered her new niche,

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arranging popular songs into bespoke wedding art songs. Had you not been willing to experiment and take some risks. As in many cases, her niche found her because she was brave enough to create content without knowing what the outcome would be. And because she simply focused on being of service to her audience. I hope her story will inspire you to be more courageous with your content,

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regardless of the type of business you have and the social media platforms you use, who knows it might even inspire you to get on Tik TOK. If you'd like to connect with Nicole, you can find her on TechStop and on Instagram at PN Cole, I'll put a link in the show notes, and if you enjoy this episode, please do connect with her.

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Then maybe you'll even be brave enough to do at one of her videos. And if you enjoy this episode, please tag us both in on Instagram, I'm at Jan Murray UK. Would you like to create super engaging content about your business and do it consistently? If so you need my courageous content planet in your life. It's a gorgeous April desk diary.

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That's so simple to use because it's based on my four by four strategy, which involves posting four styles of content four days a week. Yes, content planning really can't be that easy there's templates for daily, weekly, monthly, and annual planning. So, you know exactly what's posed where and when plus hundreds of ready to go content ideas and prompts. So you'll never run out of ideas for social media posts again,

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and accountability trackers to keep you consistent with your posting. The courageous content planner is both practical and proceed with four gorgeous cover designs to choose from. So if you want to ditch the content overwhelm and you want a simple content plan, you can actually stick to head over to courageous content, planet.com to order your copy today. Thanks for listening to the courageous content podcast.

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If you enjoyed this episode, please leave a review on apple podcast or share the episode on social media. That way more people can benefit from the free tips and strategies I share and be sure to tag me in when you do I'm at Jan Murray on Instagram, Twitter, and TikTok.

About the Podcast

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Courageous Content with Janet Murray
Content marketing advice for small businesses

About your host

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Janet Murray

I’m Janet Murray and I’ve helped thousands of coaches, creative and entrepreneurs learn how to create engaging content – so they can build their online audience and make more sales in their business.

I’m also a podcaster and keynote speaker who has spoken all over the world about content marketing and building online audiences.

Work with me and I’ll teach you the strategies I’ve used to grow a multi six figure online business, selling digital products (including Ebooks, online courses and two membership sites). And launch a physical product – the Social Media Diary & Planner, which has sold thousands of copies, all over the world.